Posts Tagged ‘صباح’

Sabah Fakhri - 1978 - Au Palais Des Congrès صباح فخري – في قصر المؤتمرات

Sabah Abu Qaws was born and raised in Aleppo. He studied at the Academy of Arab Music in Aleppo, and moved to the Damascus Academy, graduating in 1948. The nationalist leader Fakhri al-Barudi appreciated his voice, describing it as “majestic,” and took him under his wing, fostering his abilities and facilitating his entry to the Syrian Broadcasting Station. Under Barudi’s influence, Abu Qaws began to record traditional Aleppine songs and chants, excelling in muwashahat (songs of Andalusian origin). He was influenced by the grand traditions of Arabic song and practiced singing the Arabic mawal, a poem delivered in dramatic tone. In appreciation for his mentor’s help, the 17-year old artist dropped his last name Abu Qaws and renamed himself Sabah Fakhri. He quickly established a wide audience in Damascus and Aleppo, and rose to overnight fame in 1960 when he began to appear on national television. Fakhri concentrated on classical Arabic tunes and traditional Aleppine music, performing all- time classics like Sayd al-Asari, Ya Mal al-Cham, and Ib’atli Ghawab. By the early 1960s, he was appeared on television comedies starring the Syrian duet Doreid Lahham and Nihad Quali. He also performed in television programs like Nagham al-Ams (The Tune of Yesterday) and al-Wadi al-Kabir (The Greatl Valley) with the Algerian singer Warda.

Over a 50-year career, Sabah Fakhri managed to bring Aleppine music into every corner of the Arab world and preserve a music style that is being discarded by a new generation of Arab artists, who are using techno-music and video clips to promote their songs, rather than a strong voice, proper tunes, and lyrics. He has established himself as the king of tarab, an Arabic term for music that is so good that it seizes the listener and music lover. In the 1960s Fakhri helped co-found the Artist Syndicate in Syria and served as a deputy for Aleppo in Parliament in 1990. In 1992, he entered the Guiness Book of World Records for being the first performer to perform non-stop, for ten hours. A journalist who attended Sabah Fakhri at the Citadel of Aleppo, a monument that the people of Aleppo take great pride in and which serves as Fakhri’s favorite venue, described the concert saying: “Sure enough, down there on the stage, a rather rotund man of somewhat diminutive stature had appeared from nowhere. He stared at the crowd for a while, then strolled slowly towards the musicians, with whom he unhurriedly exchanged a few words. Finally the show seemed about to begin. Sabah Fakhri, dressed in a dark suit and tie and looking more like a businessman than my idea of an adulated star, grabbed the old-fashioned microphone, unraveling its cord as he measured his steps around the stage; then, without warning, his voice soared towards the skies. It was strong and pure and very distinctive. There is no way one can ever confuse his voice with anyone else’s after hearing him even once. It bestows on listeners one of these rare moments of grace during which they are confronted with perfection. The singer, at one with his musicians, was transubstantiated: they formed an uncorrupted composition, an entirely harmonious whole. This kind of music does not touch the intellect, but something far more primordial. It is as pure and nostalgic as the sound of the nay in the twilight, or a call to prayer at dawn. The concert lasted more than four hours, at the end of which the singer, as if in a trance, began to twirl to the music, faster and faster, not unlike a zikr performer, bringing the audience’s enthusiasm to a paroxysm.”

http://www.sabahfakhri.org/

TrackList:

  1. Yamourrou Oujban (يمرّ عُجْباً (04:36
  2. Fir’rode Ana Shouft (في الروّض أنا شُفت (05:26
  3. Yazal Kawam (ياذا القوم السمهري (04:12
  4. Ya Bahjat Ar’roh (يابهجة الروح (11:51
  5. Sibouni Ya Nasse (سيبوني ياناس (04:43
  6. Al Foul Wil Yassmine (الفُل والياسمين (04:51
  7. Habibi Alad’dounya (حبيبي على الدنيا (14:10
  8. Al-Ouzoubia (العزوبية (03:53
  9. Ya Shadil’ Al-Han (ياشادي الألحان (03:31
  10. Ya Hadial Isse (ياحادي العيس (06:23
  11. Win’ Nabi Yamma (والنّبي يمّا (01:48
  12. Malek Ya Hilwa (مالك ياحُلوه مالك (01:42
  13. Sayd’l Assari (صَيْد العصاري (01:43
  14. Ya Teyra Tiri (ياطيْرة طيري (01:56
  15. Ya Mal’ Sham (يامال الشام (05:27

Duration : 86:11 | Bitarte : 320 kBit/s | Year : 1978 | Size : 166 mb

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Rima Khcheich -  Min Sihr Ouyounak ريما خشيش - من سحر عيونك

Unlike many artists in Lebanon, and elsewhere in the Arab world in recent years, vocalist Rima Khcheich has not fallen into the trap of copying the charismatic diva Sabah.

In “Min Sihr Ouyounak” (The Magic in your Eyes), her tribute album to Sabah (b. 1927), Khcheich revisits some of the titles the legendary singer had interpreted during her appearances in Egyptian cinema.

With several artists releasing remakes of Sabah songs and a biographical TV drama released for Ramadan last year, the competition to claim Shahroura’s musical legacy is ruthless.

Khcheich was among the first vocalists to pay tribute to Sabah.

During the 2010 Dubai International Film Festival, she performed a selection of the legendary Lebanese actress and crooner’s film songs.

“Min Sihr Ouyounak” is a recording of Khcheich’s May 2011 concert at the American University of Beirut’s Assembly Hall. Though she hasn’t altered the songs’ original orchestration, Khcheich’s vocal character rules the album.

A reinterpretation of the Sabah repertoire was “never among my projects,” confides Khcheich. “I was asked by [DIFF] organizers to come up with a tribute to Sabah, and I grew to enjoy working on her songs. Everything was so new to me, and I put in a lot of love in this.”

Renowned worldwide for her collaborative work, which mingles tarab with jazz, Khcheich says the Sabah world was quite alien to her. “But there are many beautiful tarab songs in Sabah’s repertoire,” she continues. “It was these hidden gems I was after.”

The 30-something vocalist offers a thorough, yet contemporary, reading of Sabah’s tunes, bringing a different texture and new dimensions to the songs.

Written for Sabah by such renowned 20th-century poets and lyricists as Salah Jaheen, Maamoun al-Shennawi and the Rahbani Brothers, the lyrics are rendered somehow more profound and multilayered by Khcheich’s vocal dexterity

In Khcheich’s interpretation, “Ana Hina Yabnil Halal” (I’m here for you, boy), penned by leftist poet Jaheen, ceases to be a young girl’s simple plea to her lover, and obtains a socio-political facet. “I am here for you, boy, I am not after fortune or money,” she sings, her voice lingering significantly over the appropriate words. “I dream of a happy and tranquil life.”

Rather than emulating the energy of Sabah’s powerful voice, Khcheich sings popular tunes like “Ya Kawini, Ya Ali” (My Torturer Ali) and “Habibit Oummaha” (A Mother’s Love for her Daughter) with a murmuring warmth.

Her rendering of Lebanese pop numbers like “Marhabtein” (Two Hellos) and “Aal Nadda” (Oh Dew!), shuns Sabah’s trademark jabali (mountain) interpretation, which is marked by a raucous delivery.

Rather than Sabah’s strong vibrato, Khcheich weaves mawals (a sort of variation on the Arab muwashah, or improvisation), a signature of her vocal technique, into the songs.

In “Aaal Nadda,” for example, she incorporates a muwal upon reviving the passion of a long lost love, her voice oscillating from gentle murmurings to a more powerful, higher-register ornamentation.

The vocalist says she didn’t want to radically reinterpret the Sabah songs she selected. “That was not the purpose of this project,” she says. “Reinterpreting the songs would have been time consuming.”

Khcheich’s accompanying orchestra (given a final mix by Notta Studio’s Wassim Jarrah and Jean Madani) revives the music of Sabah collaborators – brilliant composers like Farid al-Atrash, Mohammad Abdel-Wahhab, Filimont Wehbe, Sayyed Mekkawi – with sharpness and depth.

Wassim Helou’s skillful play on the tabla and Imane Homsi’s oud talents set the tone for the concert and drive the musical ensemble.

The fact that it’s a live recording adds to the charm of “Min Sihr Oyounak.” The audience response to the singer and the music is clearly rapturous, bringing yet another dimension to the music.

Though her vocal style differs drastically from that of Sabah, Khcheich was unable let go of one key trait of Shahroura’s persona – the diva’s immaculate coquetterie. Yet Khcheish remains her own sort of coquette.

“I am on my way to meet my baby. I am going now straight away,” Khcheich warbles in a tune from Sabah’s 1964 film “Afrah al-Shabab” (Youth Fun), directed by Lebanese filmmaker Mohammad Salman.

Khcheich says that the songs selected for her Sabah tribute concert invariably reflect her own character. “I chose the songs that resemble me and interpreted [them] in my own way,” she says. “In a form that best resembles me.”

Rima Khcheich ريما خشيش

This is a Live Tribute to Sabah, recorded at the Assembly Hall (American University of Beirut) with the participation of:

Musicians:

  • Michel Khairallah / Tony Khalifeh / Mona Semaan / Anis Hawi  – Violins
  • Afif Merhej – Oud
  • Imane Homsi  – Qanoun
  • Samir Siblini – Nay
  • Khaled Omran – Double Bass
  • Wassim Helou – Tabla
  • Salman Baalbaki – Riq

Choir:

  • Manal Bou Malhab
  • Nermine Jamal El Dine
  • Carole Lahoud
  • Rana Nader
  • Omar Sinno
  • Toufic Al Kalash
  • Mohammad Al Kalash

The songs selection is made from Films featuring Sabah.

Album produced by Rima Khcheich and Emile Slailaty

TrackList:

  1. Marhabtein (06:04)
  2. Rouh Ala Mahlak (04:09)
  3. Ana Hina Yabnil Halal (06:01)
  4. Ya Kawini Ya Ali (05:24)
  5. El Ghawi (10:19)
  6. Rayha Abel Habibi (06:41)
  7. Habibit Oummaha (06:16)
  8. Min Sihr Ouyounak (06:36)
  9. El Samkeh (05:31)
  10. Ahibbak Yani (05:43)
  11. Al Nadda (04:50)

Duration : 67:33 | Bitarte : 320 kBit/s | Year : 2011 | Size : 160 mb

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9
Jul

Café Beirut قهوة بيروت

   Posted by: Ninorta    in Arabic, Lebanon, Oldies

Café Beirut قهوة بيروت

Café Beirut قهوة بيروت, a set that brings together Lebanese musical artists from the 1960s  and 70s, is a fascinating musical history lesson. Wadih El Safi , Fairuz, and Sabah are included here, among others.
This is another excellent collection from the vaults of EMI Arabia, this time covering the Golden Age of Lebanese pop. Café Beirut features passionate Arabic singers (both male and female) backed by traditional ensembles rich with strings and percussion.

  1. Etob El Nili التوب النيلي (Wadih El Safi وديع الصافي)
  2. Ishar إسهار (Fairouz فيروز)
  3. Ya Samrah Ya Tamer Hendi  ياسمرة يا تمر هندي (Issam Raggi عصام رجي)
  4. Zay El Assal زي العسل (Sabah صباح)
  5. Ma Bijouz ما بيجوز (Nasri Shams Eldine نصري شمس الدين)
  6. Darabni Ou Baka ضربني وبكى (Samira Tewfic سميرة توفيق)
  7. Elly Bithebbo Latife اللي بتحبو لطيفة (Philemon Wehbe فيلمون وهبي)
  8. Ya Heneina يا حنينه (Leyla Ramzi ليلى رمزي)
  9. Hezze Mahramek هزي محرمتك (Samir Yazbeck سمير يزبك)
  10. Ezzabi عزابي (Elie Choueiry ايلي شويري)
  11. Wehyatak Al Ghali وحياتك عالغالي (Josheph Azar جوزيف عازار)
  12. Baddak Baddak بدك بدك (Melhem Barakat ملحم بركات)

Duration : 58:15 | Bitarte : 320 kBit/s | Year : 60’ – 70’ | Size : 123 mb

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